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History of Terrorism: Anarchism and Anarchist Terrorism

Anarchism was a late 19th-century idea among a number of Europeans, Russians, and Americans that all government should be abolished, and that voluntary cooperation, rather than force, should be society's organizing principle. The word itself comes from a Greek word, anarkos , which means "without a chief.
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Pioneer Life Printables

A pioneer is a person who explores or settles in a new area. Lewis and Clark were the first to officially explore the American west after the United States gained the land in the Louisiana Purchase. After the War of 1812, many Americans started moving west to establish homes in the unsettled land. Most western pioneers traveled along the Oregon Trail, which began in Missouri.
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Interesting

Arab Spring Impact on the Middle East

The Arab Spring's impact on the Middle East has been profound, even if in many places its final outcome might not become clear for at least a generation. Protests that spread across the region in early 2011 started a long-term process of political and social transformation, marked in the initial stages primarily by political turbulence, economic difficulties, and even conflict.
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Life

5 Key Events in Affirmative Action History

Affirmative action, also know as equal opportunity, is a federal agenda designed to counteract historic discrimination faced by ethnic minorities, women and other underrepresented groups. To foster diversity and compensate for the ways such groups have historically been excluded, institutions with affirmative action programs prioritize the inclusion of minority groups in the employment, education and government sectors, among others.
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The American Athletic Conference

The American Athletic Conference, typically called simply "The American," is the result of the 2013 break-up and reorganization of the Big East Conference. The American is one of the most geographically spread out conferences with member schools ranging from Texas to New England. The member institutions are all relatively large comprehensive universities, both public and private.
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Life

The Flying Shuttle and John Kay

In 1733, John Kay invented the flying shuttle, an improvement to weaving looms and a key contribution to the Industrial Revolution. Early Years Kay was born on June 17, 1704, in the Lancashire hamlet of Walmersley. His father Robert was a farmer and wool manufacturer. Robert died before John was born His mother was responsible for educating him until she remarried.
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